Canada’s new accessible banknotes are made from polymer and feel quite different than our paper banknotes. Let’s start by learning some ways to easily separate the bills. One way is to “snap” the bills – you can do this by taking one between your thumb and middle finger and making the snapping motion with your fingers. If you have more than two bills you would like to separate, you can tap them on a hard surface and fan out the bills. You can count out your bills by pushing notes, using your thumb, from one hand to another. Most importantly, Canadian bank notes -polymer and paper- have tactile markings to make it easier for people with vision loss to identify them. It is not braille. The tactile markings are a group of dots that feel like a tall rectangle block like the number six on a pair of dice. The raised dots are in the top left-hand corner of polymer notes and in the top right hand corner of paper notes. If there is one set of raised dots, then it is a $5 banknote If there are two sets of raised dots, then it is a $10 banknote If there are three sets of raised dots, then it is a $20 banknote If there are four sets of raised dots, then it is a $50 banknote If there is one group of raised dots at the corner of the bill and one group of tactile markings at the middle of the bill, then it is a $100. The raised dots make it easy to place bills sorted by denomination with all of the tactile markings aligned in a wallet. Please note it is important not to crease the new bank notes, so as to keep them in good condition.